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Travel | Car
States With The Rudest Drivers

THE TOP CITATIONS IN 10 STATES

Driving can be stressful, especially if you aren’t familiar with the area and factor in circumstances such as road conditions, construction, traffic and other driver mishaps. However, stress can lead to danger when other drivers ignore driving rules and disregard safety regulations.

You’ll find rude drivers everywhere, but according to a recent study from Insurify, some states have higher rates of rude driving than others. 

Is your state home to the rudest drivers? Are you guilty of doing some of the rudest actions? Read on to learn more about where your state stacks up, and some of the most common citations.
  
Worst drivers by state info
 
RUDE DRIVER INSIGHTS

There are a number of offenses that constitute rude driving, including:

  • Failure to yield (the right of way, or to a pedestrian)
  • Failure to stop (at a stop sign, red light, or school bus)
  • Improper backing
  • Passing where prohibited
  • Tailgating
  • Street racing
  • Fleeing the scene of an accident

On average in the U.S., the share of drivers with “rude” infractions on their record is 25.90 per 1,000 drivers. Among the top 10 states with the rudest drivers, the average is 46% higher, at 37.88 per 1,000 drivers.
 
AngryDriver
 

TOP STATES WITH THE RUDEST DRIVERS

1. Virginia

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 43.26 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

Virginia earned the top spot of rudest drivers for the second year in a row, with drivers being rude more than 41% more often than drivers in other states. In fact, running stop signs happens 40% more frequently in this state than the national average.

2. Delaware

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 41.25 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a red light      

Delaware drivers are cited for rude driving 38% more often than the average driver in the U.S. The most common citation, failure to stop at a red light, is 59% higher than the national average.

3. Idaho

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 39.97 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

While Idaho drivers seem to be improving slightly, dropping to the third spot from #2 in 2020, they still are cited for rude behavior at a rate of 36% higher than the national average.

3. Georgia

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 39.53 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

4. Wyoming

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 38.35 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

5. Ohio

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 37.67 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

6. Wisconsin

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 35.29 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

7. Nebraska

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 35.14 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

8. Iowa

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 34.80 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a stop sign

9. Alaska

  • Drivers cited for rude behavior: 33.53 out of 1,000
  • Most common rude citation: Failure to stop at a red light

Seatbelt
 
STATES WITH THE NICEST DRIVERS

Not all states have rude drivers. In fact, there are three states that rise above the rest with the lowest share of rude drivers. Also known as the nicest driving states, the rate of rude drivers is:

  • Kentucky: 10.01 per 1,000 drivers
  • Mississippi: 14.15 per 1,000 drivers
  • Maine: 14.61 per 1,000 drivers

Multitasking
 
HOW TO AVOID RUDE DRIVERS

Whether you live in a state topping the charts with the rudest drivers, or you simply want to be safer behind the wheel, doing what you can to avoid making another driver angry can help you be a better driver. Here are a few tips:

  • Be courteous when driving. Avoid cutting people off, flashing your lights, or doing other actions that could be mistaken for aggression. Also pay attention to your surroundings and move to a slower lane if someone is trying to pass you.
  • Don’t tailgate, not only because it’s rude, but also because being too close to someone if they have to stop suddenly could cause an accident.
  • Avoid rude gestures, which can only escalate situations.
  • Use common sense. For example, don’t block parking spots or streets, avoid double parking, don’t take a spot someone is waiting for, etc.
  • Pay attention to the road at all times. Put down your cell phone, set your GPS before starting the trip, and make sure kids or pets are securely situated prior to leaving. Avoiding distractions can ensure you’re keeping others around you safe.
  • Be apologetic if you make a mistake. Sending a quick wave or smile to the other driver can go a long way.